Jesus came for the dirty ones / So Jesus came for me


L ast Sunday, near the end of the service, the worship band performed a song written by Summitview’s very own Stephen Parker and Amber Constant. The song followed Pastor Perry’s sermon on Luke 2 and the utter lowliness of the shepherds who were visited by angels that first Christmas night. That the shepherds were the first to hear about the newborn King tells us a lot about the Savior the angels were proclaiming. First and foremost, it means that Jesus calls those who know they are sinners. Parker and Constant’s “Dirty Ones” is as somber as it is beautiful, and that contrast reveals the strange but amazing grace of Jesus.

Take a few minutes to listen, ponder and pray. And take note of the subtle verb-tense change in the last chorus.

“Push the cows out the way,
For a King’s to be born,”
Said the angelic choir
To sing for the scorned of the world

Even if I had riches
What gift would I bring?
What item or gesture
Is fit for a King like him?

Jesus came for the dirty ones
The ones outside, unclean
And I am one of the dirty ones
So Jesus came for me

So I’ll go find my King
Where adulterers weep
Search the town for a place
That is surely beneath even me

Watch him teach the unworthy
And touch the impure
See him dine with the lowly
And heal those who don’t have a cure

Jesus came for the dirty ones
The ones outside, unclean
And I am one of the dirty ones
So Jesus came for me

Hear him plead for the town
That would scream for his blood
Watch him die so that swindlers and whores
Could be children of God

But God with us in flesh,
The one death could not hold,
Washed me white with his blood,
Bids me sing, “It is well with my soul.”

Jesus came for the dirty ones
The ones outside, unclean
And I was one of the dirty ones
But Jesus came for me